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New Medicine

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Scientists to develop new solutions for treatment & diagnosis of chronic ailments: ISC 2023
BioSpectrum

A proprietary diagnostic test has been developed which is highly sensitive and is capable of detecting liver disease from the blood serum samples. Dr Bishnu Pada Chatterjee, Emeritus Professor, Department of Natural Sciences, West Bengal University of Technology, Kolkata, informed that as the test uses only blood serum samples, it is minimally invasive and inexpensive as well.

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Research: Laser therapy helps improve short term memory problems
The Print

In a study that was recently published in Science Advances, laser light therapy was found to be successful in enhancing short-term memory. Researchers from Beijing Normal University and the University of Birmingham in the UK and China showed that non-invasive therapy can increase working memory in persons by up to 25 percent.

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IIT-M develops new-generation super-abrasive tools for dental surgery
BioSpectrum

A newly developed technology can now produce new-generation multi-point/single-layer superabrasive tools for advanced grinding applications to meet high productivity and energy-efficient material removal requirements. The tools produced also have enhanced tool life.

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Researchers discover essential step in recharging the eye’s light-sensing retina
Pharma Biz

Scientists have discovered a mechanism by which an area of a protein shape-shifts to convert vitamin A into a form usable by the eye’s light-sensing photoreceptor cells. A previously uncharacterized area of the protein known as RPE65 spontaneously turns spiral-shaped when it encounters intracellular membranes, or thin structures that surround different parts of a cell.

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IIT-Delhi, AIIMS researchers devise a robotic hand for paralytics
The Times of India

Researchers from IIT-Delhi, in collaboration with AIIMS, have developed the first robotic hand exoskeleton device for rehabilitation of wrist and finger joints for stroke survivors.

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AIIMS Nagpur performs its first bone marrow transplants
The Economic Times

The department of haematology at All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) Nagpur successfully conducted bone marrow transplants (BMT) for two paediatric patients recently. With this, AIIMS became the first and only government hospital in Maharashtra to have this facility. Vidarbha and central India have a high prevalence of blood disorders like thalassaemia and sickle cell. BMT is the only permanent solution for these blood disorders. The successful BMT at AIIMS with the financial support of government health schemes could be a boon for the poor patients living with these disorders. However, the two surgeries done in AIIMS in the last three weeks were not on thalassaemia patients.

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Robotic kidney transplant done at Safdarjung Hospital, doctors claim first for a govt facility
The Print

A 39-year-old man underwent a robotic kidney transplant at Safdarjung hospital here, which doctors claimed to be the first such surgery to have been performed at a central government facility in the country.

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The SSI Mantra: India's own surgical robot boasts cheaper price tag
Business Standard

India now has a homegrown robotic surgery system that holds out promise of less prohibitive costs in a niche category of medical treatment, thanks to the efforts of a US returnee cardiac surgeon and his tech team. Designed in India, the SSI Mantra aims to rival the widely popular da Vinci surgical system, which is manufactured by global market leader Intuitive Surgical, and costs less than a third of the latter. The SSI Mantra costs around Rs 4.5 crore and da Vinci Rs 15 crore. It is already being deployed at the Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute and Research Centre in New Delhi, where it was installed last month and has so far performed 22 complex surgeries.

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Researchers develop gene therapy for rare ciliopathy
ANI News

Researchers have developed a gene therapy that rescues cilia defects in retinal cells affected by a type of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), a disease that causes blindness in early childhood.

Global coverage

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COVID-19 remains a public health emergency, says WHO
The Hindu

The World Health Organization (WHO) said on Monday that COVID-19 continues to constitute a public health emergency of international concern, its highest form of alert. The pandemic was likely in a "transition point" that continues to need careful management to "mitigate the potential negative consequences", the agency added in a statement.

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EMA committee recommends marketing approval for Bayer’s darolutamide to treat metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer
Pharma Biz

The Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) of the European Medicines Agency has recommended darolutamide, an oral androgen receptor inhibitor (ARi), plus ADT in combination with docetaxel for marketing authorization in the European Union (EU) for the treatment of patients with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer (mHSPC).

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OncoC4 begins patient dosing in PRESERVE-004 phase 2 trial of ONC-392 in combo with Keytruda to treat platinum-resistant ovarian cancer
Pharma Biz

OncoC4 has been dosed in the phase 2 combination study of ONC-392, a nextgen target-preserving anti-CTLA-4 antibody and Keytruda (pembrolizumab), Merck’s anti-PD-1 therapy, in patients with platinum-resistant ovarian cancer (PROC) (PRESERVE-004, NCT05446298).

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FDA lifts partial clinical hold for bluebird bio’s Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) studies for patients under the age of 18
Businesswire

bluebird bio’s  today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) lifted its partial clinical hold for patients under the age of 18 in studies evaluating lovotibeglogene autotemcel (lovo-cel) for sickle cell disease (SCD).

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Inflammation a significant factor contributing to Alzheimer's disease: Study
ANI News

Inflammation has increasingly been identified as a significant factor contributing to Alzheimer's disease, and a recent study relates this inflammation to a gene abundant in the brain's clearing cells, known as microglia. The discoveries might present a fresh target for treatments of the untreatable illness.

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A measles patient can infect 18 others: WHO explains how deadly the virus can be
Live Mint

The recent measles outbreak is risking millions of lives, the World Health Organisation (WHO) asserted saying that a single case can lead to 12 to 18 infections. As the situation is getting worse this season, the UN health agency pointed out that the wrath of the virus was equally severe last year.

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ICMR issues new guidelines for prescribing antibiotics
The Telegraph

The Indian Council of Medical Research has issued guidelines warning against the use of antibiotics for conditions such as low-grade fever and viral bronchitis while advising doctors to follow a timeline while prescribing them. The ICMR guidelines stated that antibiotics should be prescribed for a duration of five days for skin and soft tissue infections, five days in case of community-acquired pneumonia and eight days for hospital-acquired pneumonia. "A clinical diagnosis most often helps us predict causative pathogens fitting into a clinical syndrome which would tailor the correct antibiotic rather than blindly relying on fever, procalcitonin levels, WBC counts, cultures or radiology to make a diagnosis of infection," the guidelines said. It stated limiting empiric antibiotic therapy to seriously ill patients.

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Study Suggests Pills Rather than Injections for Cancer, Diabetic Patients
ANI News

It is now possible for cancer and diabetic patients to manage their ailments using pills rather than needles and injections thanks to research at UC Riverside. Some drugs for these diseases dissolve in water, so transporting them through the intestines, which receive what we drink and eat, is not feasible. As a result, these drugs cannot be administered by mouth. However, UCR scientists have created a chemical "tag" that can be added to these drugs, allowing them to enter blood circulation via the intestines. The details of how they found the tag, and demonstrations of its effectiveness, are described in a new Journal of the American Chemical Society paper.

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'Protein Prompt' may Lead to Possible Universal Covid Treatment
The Week

Scientists have found a way to produce a protein in mice that can block multiple variants of the SARS-CoV-2 virus from entering cells and causing respiratory disease, an advance that may lead to a 'universal' treatment for COVID-19. Using messenger RNA (mRNA) packaged in lipid nanoparticles, the scientists showed in a mouse model that host cells can produce a 'decoy' enzyme that binds to coronavirus spike proteins, meaning the virus should not be able to latch onto cells in the host's airway and start the infection. "Rather than messenger RNA as a vaccine, this shows that mRNA can be used as a universal therapy against different coronaviruses," said lead researcher Gaurav Sahay from Oregon State University (OSU) in the US.

Health Services

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FIP contributes to sustainable health systems with new guidance to support self-care of reflux symptoms
Pharma Biz

International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) has now released its new quick reference guidance for pharmacists on managing symptoms of reflux.

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After Co-WIN, government launches U-WIN to digitise India’s universal vaccination programme
Express Healthcare

Carrying vaccination cards of children and pregnant women, struggling to keep a tab on the next jab and other such hassles may soon become a thing of the past. After the success of the Co-WIN platform, the government has now replicated it to set up an electronic registry for routine vaccinations. Named U-WIN, the programme to digitise India’s Universal Immunisation Programme (UIP) has been launched in a pilot mode in two districts of each state and Union Territory.

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In new rules, govt set to cap steroid dose for hospitalised Covid patients
The Times of India

Upcoming central government guidelines on Covid treatment will cap steroid dosage for admitted patients with hypoxia (low oxygen levels or breathlessness), health ministry sources said on Wednesday. The revised guidelines will fix the daily lower dose of methylprednisolone injection at 32mg or 40mg of predniselone or equivalent daily dose of dexamethasone (6mg), irrespective of a patient’s body weight. The guidelines are being drafted and will be released soon, a ministry official said.

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Govt promotes adoption of ABDM by offering incentives up to Rs 4 crore to hospitals, labs
BioSpectrum

The National Health Authority (NHA), Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India, has announced a Digital Health Incentive Scheme (DHIS) for the stakeholders of the digital health ecosystem. The scheme aims to give a further boost to digital health transactions in the country under the Ayushman Bharat Digital Mission (ABDM). The incentives under this scheme would be provided to hospitals and diagnostic labs and also to the providers of digital health solutions such as Hospital/ Health Management Information System (HMIS) and Laboratory Management Information System (LMIS).

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Use masks in crowded places, take precaution dose of Covid vaccine: NITI Aayog member Dr V K Paul
PTI

Only 27-28 percent of India's eligible population have taken the precaution dose of COVID-19, NITI Aayog member (Health) Dr V K Paul on Wednesday and advised people to take the jab and wear masks in crowded places. He urged people not to panic and clarified that there was no change in the guidelines for international air travel so far. "People should wear masks in crowded areas. Those who have comorbidities or are elderly should especially adhere to this," Paul said. Paul made the statements following a review meeting held by Union Health Minister Mansukh Mandaviya amid a surge in Covid cases globally, especially in China. "In view of the rising cases of COVID-19 in some countries, I reviewed the situation with experts and officials today. Covid is not over yet. I have directed all concerned to be alert and strengthen surveillance. We are prepared to manage any situation," Mandaviya said in a tweet.

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Govt hospitals must treat all, rules high court
The Times of India

Medical treatment has to be provided to all citizens by government hospitals in the capital, irrespective of the patient’s place of residence, Delhi High Court said on Tuesday, observing that hospitals cannot insist on the “voter ID”.

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Assam CM inaugurates second ultramodern radiotherapy unit in cancer care centre of Guwahati city hospital
ANI News

Assam Chief Minister Himanta Biswa Sarma on Saturday inaugurated the second ultramodern radiotherapy unit in the cancer care centre of Health City Hospital in Guwahati.

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Centre caps processing charges by private blood banks
MSN

When you donate blood, it is not transfused into a needy patient directly. The donated blood, also referred to as whole blood, is processed or spun in centrifuges to separate it into transfusable components. This includes red cells, platelets, and plasma. The exercise is referred to as blood processing and it comes at a cost. In order to standardise charges and put a cap on it, the Centre has recently released a detailed guideline. It states that private blood banks cannot charge more than Rs 1,550 for processing whole blood.

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WHO launches new guide for integration of perinatal mental health in maternal and child health services
Pharma Biz

Life altering moments like pregnancy, birth, and early parenthood can be stressful for women and their partners. As a result, women may undergo a period of poor mental health or witness a worsening of previous mental health conditions.

Industry

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Essilor launches lenses to slow down progression of myopia among children in India
Financial Express

Essilor, a global major in prescription lenses, on Wednesday announced that it has launched Essilor Stellest lens in India, to combat myopia progression in children. According to the lens maker, the Stellest lens has been designed with an exclusive technology called Highly Aspherical Lenslet Target (HALT) by Essilor’s research and development teams.

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Scientists developing early Alzheimer’s disease detection sensor
The Print

Researchers with the SFU Nanodevice Fabrication Group are developing a new biosensor that can be used to screen for Alzheimer’s disease and other diseases. An overview of their work has been recently published in the journal Nature Communications.

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How the adoption of AI in healthcare is advancing in medical treatment
The Economic Times

Artificial Intelligence (AI) has been prevalent in almost every business sector. However, in recent years, technology has burst into the healthcare landscape, propelling innovations and showcasing the potential to support medical practitioners and patients. From early disease diagnosis, drug discovery and trials, and precision in patient monitoring to self-care, AI algorithms have augmented the expertise of healthcare providers. According to the stats – AI expenditure in India is estimated to reach $11.78 bn by 2025, expected to add $1 trillion to the Indian economy by 2035. The new-age technology is dominating the healthcare industry so much that it’s being referred to as the new nervous system. It is significantly transforming and improving key processes in, as well as, outside of frontline clerical work. The automation tools powered by AI further improve operational efficiencies and free up the focus on patient care. As the healthcare industry is moving towards home care, the need for AI technology is being felt strongly by the stakeholders.

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Protein-based vaccines must be given a shot: Experts
The Economic Times

Amid the emergence of the new Omicron sub lineage BF.7, which is driving the current Covid surge in China, experts say the use of protein subunit vaccines as booster doses should be encouraged as they elicit robust immune response. The supply of protein subunit vaccines as the best booster choice should be increased, Anurag Agrawal, former head of the Indian SARS-CoV-2 Genomics Consortium and chair of the World Health Organization's technical advisory group on virus evolution, said. But there is no need to change the target population, he added. The government had earlier this year opened booster shots against Covid-19 for all adults aged 18 and above. However, only 27-28 percent of India's population has taken the booster dose till date. Experts have emphasised on the need to take the precaution dose as cases surge alarmingly globally. "From what we understand, two doses of vaccination followed by a booster should provide adequate protection against symptomatic disease to virtually all of the population. We should concentrate on ensuring that the over-60 population has been boosted and that mask-wearing and similar protective measures including avoiding crowds is encouraged among vulnerable groups, including the aged, for now," said Gautam Menon, professor of physics and biology at Ashoka University. Experts vouch for heterologous boosting and say that protein-based vaccines are better. India has two protein subunit vaccines: Biologicals E's Corbevax and Serum Institute of India's Covovax. "Increase boosters, use protein vaccines. That's what we should do," said virologist Shahid Jameel of the University of Oxford.

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IMA issues advisory on impending COVID outbreak
Express Healthcare

Amid a sudden surge in COVID-19 cases in some countries around the world, the India Medical Association (IMA) has issued an advisory to contain the spread of the virus. As per the advisory, “In view of the sudden surge of COVID cases in different countries, Indian Medical Association alerts and appeals the public to follow COVID appropriate behaviour with immediate effect. As per the available reports, nearly 5.37 lakh new cases have been reported in last 24 hours from major countries like USA, Japan, South Korea, France and Brazil. India has reported 145 new cases in last 24 hours out of which four cases are the new China variant – BF.7.”

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4 cases of BF.7 driving China's Covid surge reported in India
The Pioneer

Four cases of the highly transmissible Omicron subvariant BF.7, apparently the strain that is driving China’s current surge of Covid cases, have been detected in India so far since October this year even as the Centre on Wednesday called for strengthening the surveillance and implementation of Covid norms, including wearing masks in crowded areas and taking the booster dose to contain the disease. Though there has been no change in international travel norms as of now, random genome sampling of travellers returning from foreign shores has been initiated at the airports across the States, many of which have already started pulling up the socks to check the virus spread.

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Healthcare experts hail US Federal Court’s dismissal of cancer risk associated with Zantac
Pharma Biz

Healthcare experts have hailed the US Federal Court’s decision to dismiss almost 2,500 lawsuits alleging links between heartburn medication Zantac (ranitidine) and cancer. The judge said that almost 2,500 lawsuits filed in federal court by plaintiffs were based on flawed science and that the only reliable testing of the blockbuster drug undertaken showed an ‘unprovable risk of cancer’.

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Health Ministry Includes Coronary Stents in NLEM
The Tribune

The Union health ministry has notified the inclusion of coronary stents in the National List of Essential Medicines, 2022, a move that will help make these life-saving medical devices more affordable. The move is based on the recommendations by an expert committee constituted to review the inclusion of stents in the list based on requirement. The National Pharmaceutical Pricing Authority (NPPA) will now fix the price of coronary stents. On November 6, the Standing National Committee on Medicines (SNCM) had submitted its recommendation for inclusion of coronary stents in the National List of Essential Medicines (NLEM), 2022 in two categories—Bare Metal Stents (BMS) and Drug Eluting Stents (DES) which include metallic DES and bioresorbable vascular scaffold (VBS)/biodegradable stents.

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Biological E to Test COVID-19 Vaccine Corbevax on Infants as Young as Six Months
BioSpectrum

Biological E (BE), a Hyderabad-based vaccine and pharmaceutical company, has recently announced the publication of CORBEVAX COVID-19 vaccine phase II/III clinical trials conducted in paediatric population (5 to <18 age group). The vaccine has demonstrated excellent safety profile in children and adolescents. The vaccine also demonstrated excellent immunogenicity as measured by humoral and cellular immune responses.  Dr Vikram Paradkar, Executive Vice President-Technical Operations, Biological E. Limited, said, “CORBEVAX getting approved for our paediatric population from 5 to 18 age-group was a major milestone for us and its subsequent Pan-India deployment for kids of 12-14 years was important in our fight against coronavirus. So far, approximately 74 million doses of CORBEVAX has been administered to kids in India and almost 33 million kids have completed two-dose primary vaccination, which represents one of the largest paediatric campaigns globally.  We plan to eventually test the vaccine on infants as young as six months, based on the excellent safety record and consistent immunogenicity observed in paediatric trials and deployment."

Doctors & Hospitals

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Artemis Hospital introduces CUVIS Joint Robotic System for total knee replacement
Express Healthcare

Knee problems are seen increasing rapidly nowadays in the age group of 45-50-year-old middle aged individuals. Sedentary lifestyle, lack of physical exercise and ignoring knee injuries are some of the major causes of this increased trend in the society informed doctors from Artemis Hospital, Gurugram. The team of doctors present at the event were Dr. I P S Oberoi, Chairperson, Orthopaedics Program & Chief-Robotic Joint Replacement and Arthroscopy Surgery; Dr Sanjay Sarup, Head Orthopedics (Unit II) & Chief pediatric Orthopedics & Spine surgery; Dr (Prof.) Ravi Sauhta – Chief & HOD Orthopedics & Joint Replacement (Unit VI); Dr Ramkinkar Jha, Chief & Unit Head Orthopedics (unit III); Dr Devendra S. Solanki, Head Orthopaedics (Unit I) & Dr Sandeep Chauhan, Head Orthopaedics (Unit III).

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NMC Warns Doctors Not to Use Stem Cell Therapy for People with Autism
Pehal News

The National Medical Commission (NMC) has directed doctors not to use stem cell therapy for treating autism, citing inadequate proof and lack of efficacy.NMC officers mentioned that none of the present worldwide pointers or research suggest stem cell therapy for the autistic. It warned doctors that in the event that they use such therapy for autism, even for promotion and commercial, it will likely be thought of as skilled misconduct and strict motion can be taken in opposition to them. Stem cell therapy is an costly therapy process which is at the moment used for blood most cancers sufferers and different haematologic issues to restore cells and tissues. As per WHO, the prevalence of autism in India is estimated to be round 1-2 per 1,000 youngsters and about 3 instances extra frequent in boys.

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AIIMS tech offers better life to cancer patients
The Times of India

AIIMS Delhi has come up with a technique that allows patients diagnosed with cancer in the lower part of the body and undergoing tumour removal to have a better life expectancy and good quality of life.

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Doctors urge Centre to include cervical cancer vaccine in immunisation programme
The Times of India

The Federation of Obstetric and Gynaecological Societies of India (FOGSI) has urged the Union government to include indigenously developed cervical cancer vaccine in its immunisation programme and administer the same to girls for free.

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Aesthetic surgeries to be done by registered medical practitioners only: NMC guidelines
The Print

Aesthetic procedures including hair transplants should be carried out only by registered medical professionals having adequate training, the National Medical Commission (NMC) said and underlined they should not be attempted by watching demonstrations in workshops or on YouTube.

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Safdarjung conducts robotic cardiothoracic surgery, third in Sept
The Morung Express

Safdarjung Hospital has become the first central government-run health facility to conduct a robotic cardiothoracic surgery. The hospital, which used the technology for the first time this September, has so far conducted three such surgeries, the authorities said. The technology was procured in October 2019 for gynaecological, urological and cardiothoracic vascular surgeries. “However, in the past two years, the programme couldn’t be started due to Covid-19. In India, there was no such established cardio programme when we bought the robotic technology. Even now, only a few hospitals have it,” said Dr Anubhav Gupta, head of the department of cardiothoracic vascular surgery (CTVS).

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Dentists should give antibiotics to high-risk patients to help prevent life-threatening heart infection
Sheffield

People who are at high risk of developing a life-threatening heart infection should be given antibiotics before undergoing invasive dental procedures, according to new research from the University of Sheffield. These results suggest that current NICE guidelines, advising against routine use of antibiotics before invasive dental procedures for those at high IE-risk, should be reconsidered. The study, led by Professor Martin Thornhill from the University’s School of Clinical Dentistry, suggests that current UK guidelines against the use of antibiotics, issued by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), could be putting high-risk patients at unnecessary extra risk when undergoing invasive dental procedures. At the same time, the results validate guidance in the USA, Europe and elsewhere that recommend that those at high-risk are given antibiotics before invasive dental procedures.

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AIIMS starts testing samples to detect monkeypox virus
Acetech News

AIIMS Delhi has started conducting tests of samples collected to detect monkeypox virus. The AIIMS virology lab under the microbiology department is one of the 15 labs authorised across the country for the test by the department of health research-Indian Council of Medical Research.

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Private ward at AIIMS to cost more due to GST on room rent above 5k
The New Indian Express

AIIMS Delhi on Thursday announced a raise in the charges of its private ward rooms. The move comes following a recent decision by the GST Council to levy a 5 percent tax on hospital room rent exceeding Rs 5,000 per day. The revised charge will be effective from July 18, as per government notification.

Drug Discovery

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Artificial intelligence helps to identify high-affinity antibody drugs
The Print

A method for finding high-affinity antibody therapeutics that is based on artificial intelligence (AI) has been created by researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine.

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A new biomaterial injected intravenously reduces inflammation and heals cells and tissues
News Drum

Scientists have developed a new biomaterial that can be injected intravenously, reduces inflammation in tissue and that could be used to repair the damage to cardiac tissue resulting from a heart attack. The researchers at the University of California (UC) San Diego, US, also provided proof of concept in a rodent model that the biomaterial could be beneficial to patients with traumatic brain injury and pulmonary arterial hypertension, the study said. The biomaterial was tested and proven effective in treating tissue damage caused by heart attacks in both rodent and large animal models, according to the study.

 

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Doxycycline effective in checking progression of Covid-19, finds study
The Times of India

In hospitalised Covid patients, doxycycline - a safe, inexpensive and widely available antibiotic with anti-inflammatory properties - reduced the need for ICU care, a global study conducted at the height of the pandemic by a group of doctors from Switzerland, UK, Germany and India has found.

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Hypertension drugs could be repurposed to delay ageing: Research
DT Next

Researchers have found that the drug rilmenidine can extend lifespan and slow ageing. Published in Aging Cell, the findings show that animals treated with rilmenidine, currently used to treat hypertension, at young and older ages increases lifespan and improves health markers, mimicking the effects of caloric restriction. They also demonstrate that the healthspan and lifespan benefits of rilmenidine treatment in the roundworm C. elegans are mediated by the I1-imidazoline receptor nish-1, identifying this receptor as a potential longevity target.

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Study shows overdose deaths involving buprenorphine did not proportionally increase with new flexibilities in prescribing
Pharma Biz

The proportion of opioid overdose deaths involving buprenorphine, a medication used to treat opioid use disorder, did not increase in the months after prescribing flexibilities were put in place during the Covid-19 pandemic, according to a new study. These data provide evidence that may help to inform buprenorphine prescribing policies.

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University of Dundee sees repurposed drug for African sleeping sickness shows potential for leukaemia treatment
Pharma Biz

University of Dundee which developed a drug developed at for a neglected tropical disease: African sleeping sickness now sees it could be repurposed to treat leukaemia following Fast Track Designation by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).  The drug, originally known as DDD86481 and now named PCLX-001, will be trialled in adult patients with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Fast Track Designation facilitates drug development and expedites the review of new therapies intended to treat or prevent serious conditions and address unmet medical needs.

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Research study exploring significant impact of ED drugs on men’s cardiac health published
Pharma Biz

A comprehensive research study manuscript examining the impact of erectile dysfunction drugs on major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) and mortality has been published by scientists from Huntington Medical Research Institutes (HMRI) in Pasadena, HealthCore Inc. and the University of California San Francisco.

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Simple nasal spray significantly reduces snoring and breathing difficulties in children: Study
The Tribune

A simple nasal spray significantly reduced snoring and breathing difficulties in children and halved the number needing to have their tonsils removed, according to a new study. The research, led by the Murdoch Children's Research Institute and published in JAMA Pediatrics, found a saline (salt water) nasal spray was just as effective as an anti-inflammatory steroid nasal spray at easing sleep-disordered breathing in children after six weeks of treatment.

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Excessive antibiotics fuelling pandemic of antimicrobial resistance: ISC 2023
Bio Spectrum

The excessive and inappropriate use of antimicrobials such as azithromycin, doxycycline, ivermectin during the treatment of COVID-19, and during secondary infections, are fuelling the raging pandemic of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). This was stated Dr Tanu Singhal, Paediatrician and Infectious Disease Specialist, Kokilaben Dhirubhai Ambani Hospital, Mumbai while speaking at a session during the 108th Indian Science Congress (ISC) in Nagpur, on 4th January 2023. Dr Tanu Singhal further said that secondary infections have been responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality during the pandemic. "The most dramatic secondary infection in the Indian context has been COVID-19 associated mucormycosis (CAM) also termed as “black fungus”. More than 50,000 cases of CAM were reported in India mainly during the second wave", she said.

Becares-Weekly

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Biological E's Corbevax Caccine to Cost ₹145 to Govt, ₹990 in Market
Live Mint

Hyderabad-based pharmaceuticals and biologics major Biological E Ltd has priced its Corbevax anti-Covid vaccine at ₹990 (inclusive of taxes and vaccine administration charges) in the private market, and ₹145 for the government vaccination programme, news agency PTI quoted the firm's managing director Mahima Datla as saying.  Currently, the vaccine is being used for the inoculation of children in the 12 to 14 age group. In view of this, the company has also expressed confidence over getting emergency use authorisation for use of its vaccine in children in the age group of 5-12 years. Biological E said its multiple manufacturing units in Hyderabad are fully qualified to enable the production of around 1 billion dosages of Corbevax annually and it is geared up to meet any increase in demand.

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Corbevax vaccine for kids: Everything you need to know about this Covid jab
Live Mint

Biological E Limited's Corbevax is being administered to children in the age group 12-14 in India. This age group got the Indian government's nod to be receive vaccine against the novel coronavirus from 16 March, Wednesday. These children have to register for getting the vaccine on the CoWIN portal. India's third indigenous anti-Covid vaccine has been manufactured by Hyderabad-based Biological E Limited. Biological E has supplied 5 crore doses of Corbevax to the Centre, which has then distributed the same to states.

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Corbevax vaccine for 5-12 years: Confident of getting EUA, Biological E says
Live Mint

Biological E seems confident regarding getting emergency use authorisation for use of its COVID vaccine Corbevax among children in the age group of 5-12 years. Currently, the vaccine is inoculated among children in the age group of 12 to 14 years The Hyderabad-based company Is qualified to produce around 1 billion dosages of Corbevax annually and it is geared up to meet any increase in demand. Currently, the company has produced 30 crore vaccines as part of its commitment made to the Government of India, with 5 crore dosages already supplied.

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Ready with 30 crore doses, can scale up production if needed: Corbevax makers
The Indian Express

Biotech firm Biological E. Limited is geared to facilitate the first phase of the vaccination drive for the 12-15 age group and is ready with 30 crore doses of which five crore has been rolled out to 17 different sites in the country, said a top official of the firm. "This is the most affordable COVID-19 vaccine for the Government of India which is providing free vaccination to all eligible citizens. The pricing of CORBEVAX in the private market will be Rs 800 (and inclusive of all taxes and vaccine administration charges will cost Rs 990) The vaccine is being sold at Rs 145 per dose to the government," Mahima Datla, managing director of Biological E. Limited said at a virtual media interaction on Wednesday. "We have an annual production capacity upto one billion vaccines," Datla said. The firm collaborated with the Texas Children's Hospital and the Baylor College to develop Corbevax vaccine. Dynavax, Inc from USA supported Corbevax development by providing the adjuvant and THSTI Delhi conducted key immunogenicity testing as part of a comprehensive clinical trial development plan.

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Covid-19: 12-14 vaccination drive off to slow start in Delhi; pick-up likely after Holi
The Times of India

Only about 3,800 children aged between 12 and 14 were vaccinated against Covid-19 in the city on Wednesday, the first day of vaccination for this cohort in the country. All the children were administered Corbevax, India's first indigenously developed protein subunit vaccine against Covid-19, made by Biological E. Each dose in the private market will cost Rs 800 per dose, excluding GST, and around Rs 990, including taxes and administration charges. For the government, the price will be Rs 145. There are nearly 6.2 lakh children in this age group in Delhi who are eligible for the vaccine. Hospital officials said the first day saw a lukewarm response; footfall is expected to pick up after Holi.

Medical Specialties

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Scientists to develop new solutions for treatment & diagnosis of chronic ailments: ISC 2023
BioSpectrum

A proprietary diagnostic test has been developed which is highly sensitive and is capable of detecting liver disease from the blood serum samples. Dr Bishnu Pada Chatterjee, Emeritus Professor, Department of Natural Sciences, West Bengal University of Technology, Kolkata, informed that as the test uses only blood serum samples, it is minimally invasive and inexpensive as well.

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Research: Laser therapy helps improve short term memory problems
The Print

In a study that was recently published in Science Advances, laser light therapy was found to be successful in enhancing short-term memory. Researchers from Beijing Normal University and the University of Birmingham in the UK and China showed that non-invasive therapy can increase working memory in persons by up to 25 percent.

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IIT-M develops new-generation super-abrasive tools for dental surgery
BioSpectrum

A newly developed technology can now produce new-generation multi-point/single-layer superabrasive tools for advanced grinding applications to meet high productivity and energy-efficient material removal requirements. The tools produced also have enhanced tool life.

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Researchers discover essential step in recharging the eye’s light-sensing retina
Pharma Biz

Scientists have discovered a mechanism by which an area of a protein shape-shifts to convert vitamin A into a form usable by the eye’s light-sensing photoreceptor cells. A previously uncharacterized area of the protein known as RPE65 spontaneously turns spiral-shaped when it encounters intracellular membranes, or thin structures that surround different parts of a cell.

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IIT-Delhi, AIIMS researchers devise a robotic hand for paralytics
The Times of India

Researchers from IIT-Delhi, in collaboration with AIIMS, have developed the first robotic hand exoskeleton device for rehabilitation of wrist and finger joints for stroke survivors.

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AIIMS Nagpur performs its first bone marrow transplants
The Economic Times

The department of haematology at All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) Nagpur successfully conducted bone marrow transplants (BMT) for two paediatric patients recently. With this, AIIMS became the first and only government hospital in Maharashtra to have this facility. Vidarbha and central India have a high prevalence of blood disorders like thalassaemia and sickle cell. BMT is the only permanent solution for these blood disorders. The successful BMT at AIIMS with the financial support of government health schemes could be a boon for the poor patients living with these disorders. However, the two surgeries done in AIIMS in the last three weeks were not on thalassaemia patients.

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Robotic kidney transplant done at Safdarjung Hospital, doctors claim first for a govt facility
The Print

A 39-year-old man underwent a robotic kidney transplant at Safdarjung hospital here, which doctors claimed to be the first such surgery to have been performed at a central government facility in the country.

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The SSI Mantra: India's own surgical robot boasts cheaper price tag
Business Standard

India now has a homegrown robotic surgery system that holds out promise of less prohibitive costs in a niche category of medical treatment, thanks to the efforts of a US returnee cardiac surgeon and his tech team. Designed in India, the SSI Mantra aims to rival the widely popular da Vinci surgical system, which is manufactured by global market leader Intuitive Surgical, and costs less than a third of the latter. The SSI Mantra costs around Rs 4.5 crore and da Vinci Rs 15 crore. It is already being deployed at the Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute and Research Centre in New Delhi, where it was installed last month and has so far performed 22 complex surgeries.

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Researchers develop gene therapy for rare ciliopathy
ANI News

Researchers have developed a gene therapy that rescues cilia defects in retinal cells affected by a type of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), a disease that causes blindness in early childhood.

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